36 Things You Obviously Need In Your New Home

beben-eleben:

A Fire Pit IN THE POOL

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A Door That Turns into a Ping-Pong Table

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Chilled Produce Drawers in the Kitchen

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A Wine Cellar Trap Door

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 A Sleepover Room

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A Door Handle That Automatically Turns Off Electricity and Gas When You Leave

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A Swing-Set Dining Table

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A Built-In TV for the Bathtub

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A Glass-Encased Fireplace

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 A Loft Hammock

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A Hot Tub That Flows from the Inside to Outside

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A Huge Round Bedroom Window

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A Stained-Glass Door

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A Library Staircase/Slide

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A Bone-Shaped Pool for Your Dog

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McDonalds’ suggested budget for employees shows just how impossible it is to get by on minimum wage

anticapitalist:

(Source: anticapitalist)

sciencemicroblog:

sagansense:

X-ray vision tracks lightning bursts

Blink and you’ve missed it. Researchers in the US have captured the world’s first X-ray images of lightning, by creating a special camera that can capture radiation at 10 million frames per second. They presented their new findings at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco and they say that this new view of lightning could help to solve some of the mysteries of this spectacular natural phenomenon.

The research was carried out at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, located in Florida. It is one of the few sites in world where lightning is initiated and studied under controlled conditions. By firing rockets with trailing wires into thunder clouds, scientists are able to generate electric fields that are large enough to trigger bolts of lightning, which then propagate back down towards the rocket launch tower.

Joseph Dwyer and colleagues at the Florida Institute of Technology became interested in the fact that lightning emits X-rays as it propagates through the air, a phenomenon that was only noted in the past decade. But given that X-ray sources in lightning travel through the Earth’s atmosphere at velocities approaching the speed of light, it is difficult to catch them on camera before they disappear. In addition, they cannot be imaged with standard mirrors and lenses because huge amounts of material are required to prevent X-rays and gamma rays from entering through the sides of a camera.

Dwyer’s team has created a customized camera that has 30 detectors made from a combination of sodium iodide and photomultiplier tubes, each measuring 3 × 3 inch. The device, which is approximately the size of a standard refrigerator, is also equipped with a 3 inch pinhole aperture, and can record X-rays at 10 million frames per second. “This is actually a very old technique for making images, like that seen in a camera obscura,” Dwyer says.

During July and August this year, Dwyer’s team studied four rocket-triggered lightning flashes at the Florida test site. Each flash lasted for approximately two seconds and the resulting sequences of images revealed that X-rays emerged primarily from the vicinity of the lightning tip as it propagated towards the Earth. As the lightning crashed into the control tower it also triggered large bursts of gamma radiation, which were also captured by the camera.

“For the first time we’re catching a glimpse of lightning in the X-ray emission,” says Dwyer. “We’re seeing lightning as Superman would see it with his X-ray vision”.

Credit: James Dacey/physicsworld.com

NO.MAMES.

(Source: spaceplasma)

othest:

I have a friend that is everyone one of these

(Source: intentandoseringeniero)

lumos5000:

i-say-no-to-status-quo:

potterheadproblems:

alliewonder:

painting i did for a friend who wanted harry potter combined with starry night

that is the most terrifyingly beautiful thing that i have seen in awhile